Atomic Date Night

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Atomic Date Night

Postby michael-ellis » Sun Jan 12, 2014 11:47 pm

Here's an illustration I did recently. It's india ink on toned paper, colored in Photoshop:

Image

http://michael-ellis.deviantart.com/#/a ... d=3c2bf768

I'm still learning, especially when it comes to coloring my stuff, so any feedback is welcome and appreciated!

-Michael
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Re: Atomic Date Night

Postby Pete_Z » Mon Jan 13, 2014 9:27 am

I'll give it a look after work. 'Atomic Date Night' sounds like it will be interesting.

One thing to nail down is how you plan on printing it and what the final size is. Once you know that, it can greatly change your coloring approach.(how you start can dictate the quality.) ie.

• I could color using blending modes and loose selections if it were to be printed digitally.
• If it is to be printed on a press I would do color 'flatting'— Basically eliminating all gaps of white between solid colors— so there is no white behind the line art. Once the flats are made, you can start rendering.
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Re: Atomic Date Night

Postby michael-ellis » Mon Jan 13, 2014 11:05 am

Thanks, Pete.

I always assume that at some point I'll be printing my stuff on paper, so I do flats as a matter of process.

I'm also not a huge fan of overly-rendered colors in comics. I know it's become the industry standard but in a lot of cases it seems a bit overwrought to me. It's just a personal preference - I like the look of flatter colors.

One issue that I've encountered is trying to find a coloring style that matches my linework. As I said, I prefer flatter colors with a bit of gradation and highlights here and there, but I could be off in the wrong direction there.

What factors influence how a colorist matches colors with linework, stylistically speaking (as opposed to technical, printing concerns)?
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Re: Atomic Date Night

Postby Pete_Z » Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:03 pm

I am figuring this out my self, but here are some thoughts I had while working on my own approaches.

It seams ok if there is some overlap of the ink and colors creating depth.

A hard edge style seams to work well with flat colors and sharp selections.

Like font choices for a graphic designer. Using an existing coloring style might look modern or dated. Might work for you or against you.
Colorizing the inks it self, AKA—Color holds, have a modern feel to me.

Paul used a flat color approach for an ad and cover of the Funk graphic novel. Limited flat color. (Kinda like you were mentioning.)
He would also be good to email about this because he does change his coloring style for the application for maximum effect.
(Right click the image> Open in New window, to see the character Keenan that is getting cut off in this preview.)
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Re: Atomic Date Night

Postby Droakir » Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:41 pm

A lot of final coloring style depends upon mood. I agree with the comment above that techniques like color holds have a very "modern" feel to them. Mainly because they weren't seen in comics until things like digital coloring became more reliable. Coloring under black and white line art has a very distinct "old school" vibe to it, which may or may not be what you're going for. The color palette used also has a significant effect on the end piece. For practice you might want to experiment with various types of limited palettes.

Paul's coloring style makes for a much more stylized, "old school" or underground feel. This really works well for the type of graphic novel that he and Pete produced.
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Re: Atomic Date Night

Postby michael-ellis » Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:43 am

I agree with the 'old school' feel of Funk, and it's a style I really like. I kind of feel like the hyper-rendered superhero comics are a bit over-wrought.

Chris Ware and Daniel Clowes do really nice work with simple, flat colors. A lot of the Fantagraphics comics use them, actually.
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